4 Ways to use Labels for Trello that will Save You Time & Energy in Your Business

When it comes to project management, Trello is a game-changer for your business. When you feel like you’re drowning in all the pieces of your business, Trello swoops in and saves the day by giving you a bird’s eye view of your workflows, tasks, due dates, and more!

For those of you who are familiar with this awesome tool, you probably know a little bit about labels. With a range of colors and the ability to add short descriptions that can be expanded in board view, labels can help you keep track of specific details in a sea of lists and cards.

Sure, you may have used them on occasion, but are you using them to their fullest potential? Probably not. No worries! Today I’m chatting 4 things you didn’t know you could do with labels so you can get the most out of these colorful tools!

 
When it comes to project management, Trello is a game-changer for your business. When you feel like you’re drowning in all the pieces of your business, Trello swoops in and saves the day by giving you a bird’s eye view of your workflows, tasks, due dates, and more!  For those of you who are familiar with this awesome tool, you probably know a little bit about labels. With a range of colors and the ability to add short descriptions that can be expanded in board view, labels can help you keep track of specific details in a sea of lists and cards.
 

Blog Topic Categories for your Editorial Calendar

If you use Trello to keep track of your editorial calendar, labels are a great way to know exactly what’s coming up!

I have a category for every week of the month, at which point I start the rotation all over again! But unless I want to click into each card, I need something that is going to be able to tell me immediately what topic I’m focusing on for the week ahead, so I can schedule all of my social media accordingly.

Now, I could just write the topic first in the card’s title and then write in the title (ex: Trello: 4 Things You Didn’t Know You Could Do with Labels for Trello), but in all honesty, it just looks clunky, and we’re trying to keep things as simple as possible here.

Labels are the perfect solution. By dedicating one label color to a blog category, you are making it super simple to see what the category is without unnecessarily bulking up your card titles or clicking into the card.

If you forget what each of the labels mean, you can always click on the label from the board view and the labels will expand with their label titles. Or, you can do what I do, and write your potential blog post ideas in checklists under category cards in a “Brain Dump” list, and add the same labels to those cards. That way they will always be visible and you’ll always know what each one is!

Payment Tracking for Service-Based Businesses

For all you service-based ladies out there, labels are a great way to track whether or not your client has paid for your services.

Using Trello as the back-end of your business really helps keep everything right at your fingertips. Keeping track of your clients is no different. I have a board dedicated just to my Current Clients, where I track everything from their website to their client process, their Instagram to, yes, whether or not they have paid.

Setting up this function is simple: in the board where you keep all of your current clients (which you should definitely have), designate the green label as “Paid in Full” and the red label as “Outstanding Balance.” If you allow 50/50 payments, you can also designate the yellow label “First Payment Received.”

This way, you always know where every client is in their payment process. It’s easy peasy!

Labels As Headers

Labels can also function as simple headers for lists of cards. If you use cards for tasks (and if you do, I highly recommend using checklists within the cards to break those tasks down), having a card at the top with a label to designate the header is a great tool!

On the weekly spread of my board, I use headers for AM, PM, and Ongoing for all of my days Monday-Sunday. This way, I’m able to see what I have to do in a certain part of the day and what has to be done on a weekly basis.

If you’re using headers for projects across an entire board, one label should be more than enough. But if you’re using Trello for your weekly spread, having different labels for AM, PM, and Ongoing might help you differentiate your tasks at a glance. The choice is up to you!

Knowing Exactly What Type of Task You’re Looking at

Remember when I talked about drowning in all the pieces of your business?

I use my weekly spread to show me all the deadlines. That means client sessions, blog posts, email campaigns, holidays, birthdays, the list goes on and on.

I used to look at my week and instantly leave my Trello app. Having all of that information sitting there, uncategorized, made my brain hurt and my stress-levels shoot up.

I decided that there had to be a better way to have this information laid out on a board that my brain could understand easily (and that would make sense when I booted up my Calendar Power-up).

So I turned to labels! I was able to choose colors for each of the deadline types so that I would easily be able to see what I had going on on any given day.

This helped a lot when I started implementing automating with Butler for Trello (but more on that in a later post!), because cards would copy over into My Week and once they landed in my “Upcoming” list I would have to look through the list and figure out just what the heck everything was.

Once I implemented labels, if I didn’t know for sure, I could just expand those labels with one click and everything would make sense!

Labels have helped my business tremendously. They save me time, help me focus, and are so easy to set up, there’s no reason not to take the leap and use them!

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